Stories covering everything from kitchen-prep to protests.

Reem Kassis didn't set out to be an author. Or a chef for that matter.  In fact she made it a point to stay as far away from the kitchen as possible.  But a desire to preserve her Palestinian heritage for her daughters led her towards her destiny in an unlikely way.  It began by collecting recipes and stories from the women in her family and before long she had gathered enough that she began to formulate a book proposal.   Read more here

Reem Kassis didn't set out to be an author. Or a chef for that matter.

In fact she made it a point to stay as far away from the kitchen as possible.

But a desire to preserve her Palestinian heritage for her daughters led her towards her destiny in an unlikely way.

It began by collecting recipes and stories from the women in her family and before long she had gathered enough that she began to formulate a book proposal.

Read more here


The only way to arrive on the shores of Cumberland Island is by boat. Once you step off the dock, you have entered into a living history book. Tangled branches overhead lock antiquity and mystery into the fabric of the island. Under Spanish moss tinseled throughout the branches of Southern Live Oaks, and up the well-worn dirt paths laden with prints from horses’ hooves, there is a gracious southern mansion from a bygone era. This was the playground of the Carnegie family and now the legacy lives on as the Greyfield Inn.  Cumberland Island boasts a long lineage of strong women. While most have heard of steel-tycoon Andrew Carnegie and his brother Thomas, as some of the founding men of America, it is less likely that the names of Margaret Carnegie Ricketson and Lucy R. Ferguson ring a bell.  Yet, it is these tenacious women that helped make Cumberland what it is today.   Read more here

The only way to arrive on the shores of Cumberland Island is by boat. Once you step off the dock, you have entered into a living history book. Tangled branches overhead lock antiquity and mystery into the fabric of the island. Under Spanish moss tinseled throughout the branches of Southern Live Oaks, and up the well-worn dirt paths laden with prints from horses’ hooves, there is a gracious southern mansion from a bygone era. This was the playground of the Carnegie family and now the legacy lives on as the Greyfield Inn.

Cumberland Island boasts a long lineage of strong women. While most have heard of steel-tycoon Andrew Carnegie and his brother Thomas, as some of the founding men of America, it is less likely that the names of Margaret Carnegie Ricketson and Lucy R. Ferguson ring a bell.

Yet, it is these tenacious women that helped make Cumberland what it is today.

Read more here



This year was a reckoning for women all over the country.  This year we saw more women  run for office  and we saw women confront those who used power to perpetuate a culture of sexual abuse, harassment and coercion.  Tarana Burke’s #MeToo  movement gained momentum and the women in the entertainment industry created the Time’s Up initiative.  So  one year after  they flooded the streets to make their voices heard, women were back at it, rallying for justice on everything from immigration to racial and gender equality. The march is a platform for women and men to not only talk the talk but walk the walk.   Read more here

This year was a reckoning for women all over the country.

This year we saw more women run for office and we saw women confront those who used power to perpetuate a culture of sexual abuse, harassment and coercion. Tarana Burke’s #MeToo movement gained momentum and the women in the entertainment industry created the Time’s Up initiative.

So one year after they flooded the streets to make their voices heard, women were back at it, rallying for justice on everything from immigration to racial and gender equality. The march is a platform for women and men to not only talk the talk but walk the walk.

Read more here



When the media rushed to the scene of the  attack at Istanbul’s Ataturk airport , photographer  Furkan Temir  took a moment to mentally prepare before going in.  Temir was born and raised in Turkey and has become all too familiar with these catastrophic scenes of violence. He has been photographing the aftermath of terrorist attacks since he was a teenager.  “I feel the responsibility,” said the 21-year-old. “I would like to tell our story.”   Read more here

When the media rushed to the scene of the attack at Istanbul’s Ataturk airport, photographer Furkan Temir took a moment to mentally prepare before going in.

Temir was born and raised in Turkey and has become all too familiar with these catastrophic scenes of violence. He has been photographing the aftermath of terrorist attacks since he was a teenager.

“I feel the responsibility,” said the 21-year-old. “I would like to tell our story.”

Read more here